Wood stove clearances

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What is a Clearance? A clearance is the safe distance from the stove to a combustible surface. Examples of combustible materials include paneling, wood, sheet rock (even fire rated), and plaster (lathe). Safe clearances for your model were determined using a very specific and detailed U.L. protocol test procedure. Specific Fire Safety Clearance Distances for Un-Certified Wood Stoves & Pellet Stoves Un-certified woodstove clearance distances: 48" to combustibles at sides, rear, and corners as well as the "fueling" or... Un-certified woodstove clearance distance: 60' above the stove top to the ceiling or any ... What is a Clearance? A clearance is the safe distance from the stove to a combustible surface. Examples of combustible materials include paneling, wood, sheet rock (even fire rated), and plaster (lathe). Safe clearances for your model were determined using a very specific and detailed U.L. protocol test procedure. Some standards specify a 2" air space. Watch out : Check with your local fire marshall about local building code requirements for fire-clearance distances before installing and using a wood stove, coal stove, or other auxiliary heat source. Making a mistake can lead to a dangerous building fire. Clearances are important because wood stoves get very hot while in operation. Combustible materials that are too close to the stove can heat up past their autoignition temperature, and catch fire. A spark is not required to start a fire, just heat, fuel, and oxygen. In most cases, clearance violations will not cause a fire immediately. Some standards specify a 2" air space. Watch out : Check with your local fire marshall about local building code requirements for fire-clearance distances before installing and using a wood stove, coal stove, or other auxiliary heat source. Making a mistake can lead to a dangerous building fire. Specific Fire Safety Clearance Distances for Un-Certified Wood Stoves & Pellet Stoves Un-certified woodstove clearance distances: 48" to combustibles at sides, rear, and corners as well as the "fueling" or... Un-certified woodstove clearance distance: 60' above the stove top to the ceiling or any ... Clearances are important because wood stoves get very hot while in operation. Combustible materials that are too close to the stove can heat up past their autoignition temperature, and catch fire. A spark is not required to start a fire, just heat, fuel, and oxygen. In most cases, clearance violations will not cause a fire immediately. What is a Clearance? A clearance is the safe distance from the stove to a combustible surface. Examples of combustible materials include paneling, wood, sheet rock (even fire rated), and plaster (lathe). Safe clearances for your model were determined using a very specific and detailed U.L. protocol test procedure. Some standards specify a 2" air space. Watch out : Check with your local fire marshall about local building code requirements for fire-clearance distances before installing and using a wood stove, coal stove, or other auxiliary heat source. Making a mistake can lead to a dangerous building fire. What is a Clearance? A clearance is the safe distance from the stove to a combustible surface. Examples of combustible materials include paneling, wood, sheet rock (even fire rated), and plaster (lathe). Safe clearances for your model were determined using a very specific and detailed U.L. protocol test procedure. Clearances are important because wood stoves get very hot while in operation. Combustible materials that are too close to the stove can heat up past their autoignition temperature, and catch fire. A spark is not required to start a fire, just heat, fuel, and oxygen. In most cases, clearance violations will not cause a fire immediately. Clearances are important because wood stoves get very hot while in operation. Combustible materials that are too close to the stove can heat up past their autoignition temperature, and catch fire. A spark is not required to start a fire, just heat, fuel, and oxygen. In most cases, clearance violations will not cause a fire immediately. Some standards specify a 2" air space. Watch out : Check with your local fire marshall about local building code requirements for fire-clearance distances before installing and using a wood stove, coal stove, or other auxiliary heat source. Making a mistake can lead to a dangerous building fire. Clearances are important because wood stoves get very hot while in operation. Combustible materials that are too close to the stove can heat up past their autoignition temperature, and catch fire. A spark is not required to start a fire, just heat, fuel, and oxygen. In most cases, clearance violations will not cause a fire immediately. What is a Clearance? A clearance is the safe distance from the stove to a combustible surface. Examples of combustible materials include paneling, wood, sheet rock (even fire rated), and plaster (lathe). Safe clearances for your model were determined using a very specific and detailed U.L. protocol test procedure. Clearances are important because wood stoves get very hot while in operation. Combustible materials that are too close to the stove can heat up past their autoignition temperature, and catch fire. A spark is not required to start a fire, just heat, fuel, and oxygen. In most cases, clearance violations will not cause a fire immediately. Specific Fire Safety Clearance Distances for Un-Certified Wood Stoves & Pellet Stoves Un-certified woodstove clearance distances: 48" to combustibles at sides, rear, and corners as well as the "fueling" or... Un-certified woodstove clearance distance: 60' above the stove top to the ceiling or any ... Some standards specify a 2" air space. Watch out : Check with your local fire marshall about local building code requirements for fire-clearance distances before installing and using a wood stove, coal stove, or other auxiliary heat source. Making a mistake can lead to a dangerous building fire.